Skipping breakfast causes the brain to seek high-calorie foods


22/10/2012

Brain scans showed that people skip breakfast more positively react to junk food than those who ate.

As you know, the breakfast - the most important meal of the day, and now neuroscientists have begun to understand why this is so. Skipping the first meal of the day, not only will make you increase the dose in the afternoon, but was forced to seek less healthy, high-calorie foods.

People who skip meals often gain weight in the long term, but the reasons for this remain unclear. Tony Goldstone of Imperial College London, scanned the brains of people who skip meals, and discovered the mechanisms that allow us to explain this phenomenon.

Any length of starvation, forced certain regions of the brain to seek high-calorie foods. "It makes evolutionary sense if you were in a situation of negative energy balance," - he said. "You will not waste time eating greens."

During the experiment, Goldstone scanned the brains of 21 people, aged about 25 years. The volunteers were shown pictures of food and asked to assess how attractive they are for all of these products, from chocolate and pizzas to vegetables and fish. During the first day, the volunteers skipped breakfast before scanning. On the second day, they ate breakfast overall nutritional value of 750 calories from cereals, bread and jam for an hour before the scan.

"Not surprisingly, not eating, they are hungry, and gave a higher score high calorie foods than ever eaten" - said Goldstone.

When the subjects were missing breakfast, we ate lunch in a 20% increase. Brain scans showed that activity in the orbifrontalnoy cortex, which is located just above the eyes, has become particularly sensitive to high-calorie food. The more people like the food, the more the activity orbifrontalnoy crust.

Original: Guardian.co.uk


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