In the Netherlands, the dog brings deadly infections in humans


16/12/2012

The two-year dog breed hound named Cliff instantly detects the presence in the body of Clostridium difficile, an intestinal infection that causes diarrhea, abdominal cramps, loss of appetite, fever and weight loss.

For the first time, "skill" Cliff has been tested in experiments with samples of the infected feces, which allocates a certain smell. Detect infection in this way are able to experienced nurses, but researchers have suggested that dogs could do it better with a sharp sense of smell.

After two months of training at the Medical Center of the University of Amsterdam, Cliff was able to correctly identify all of the 50 samples of feces of infected patients and 47 of 50 negative samples, reports the journal BMJ. com.

But his impressive work did not cease.

During one of his visits to the hospital the dog was able to identify 25 of the 30 infected patients, just sniffing the air around their beds, correctly finding that 265 of the 270 patients were carriers of infection, reports Daily Mail.

When the animal finds a patient with superbagom in the body, it sits near the patient’s bed, giving the sign so the doctor. If Cliff passes the bedside, so it is not infected infection. However, the most difficult to test, as reported by the researchers was to continue to get the dog to sit for a while near the patient’s bed.

Dr. Marije Boumers (Marije Bomers), which Trained Cliff, said: "We were all in the House, and Cliff quietly sat at the bedside of patients infected with Clostridium difficile. But it was very difficult for him because, smell the infection, he became very excited. "

Dutch researchers suggest in the future to train more animals to use them to prevent outbreaks of Clostridium difficile in hospitals.

Original in (English.) Topnews.in Translation: M. Potter


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