Launcher come down from outer space to Earth by parachute. Photo


16/11/2007

Question: How can I return to Earth launch vehicle weighing nearly 100 tons, after he will bring cargo into orbit and send it to the moon? The simple answer is: very carefully and gently!

NASA has just dealing with this problem. NASA plans to soon return to his plans for the Moon - a new machine to run there and Ares launch vehicles to return to Earth for reuse in future. Well, we can not allow just two heavy rocket crashed into the ocean. We need to gently return to Earth.

Now, NASA has successfully tested its new development - a giant parachute, which returned to Earth the first stage carrier rocket from the machine Ares I. A huge parachute, a diameter of 150 meters, relatively gently lowered in Arizona a heavy load from a height of more than 5 kilometers. 19-ton stage rocket dropped by parachute from a C-17 aircraft. The parachute worked perfectly, and the cargo landed safely at the intended landing site. The tests, which took place on September 25 and November 15 were carried out with weights lighter than the full weight of the rocket (about 100 tons), but the results have given scientists a good ground for reflection on the area of the drag chute and its design.

The parachute is made of Kevlar, which is stronger and lighter than nylon, so that a large-sized parachute can fit in a smaller volume without increasing its weight.

Ares I parachute system consists of three types of parachutes:

small pilot chute, pull the auxiliary brake parachute

Auxiliary 20-meter parachute that sets the launcher in a vertical position and slow decline

Three main parachute, which further slows the fall, sending the goods to the place of landing

Tests of the parachute system will continue through 2010. Only our informers tell the news on the latest news.

Original: Science.nasa.gov


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