Wasps punished fake teasers


23/08/2010

If you act from a position of strength, but can not prove their claims with real actions, then, most likely, will get into trouble. And the same is true if you’re really strong, but with a mind for you are not. As it turned out, the same principle applies to wasps - they do not favor scams.

When female wasps species Polistes, fighting for dominance in the nest, they judge each other’s fighting abilities by coloring the face: individuals with the most fragmented patterns are considered to be the strongest.

At first glance, this situation represents a fertile ground for the emergence of a variety of scams, only pretending to be strong. Any mutation which results in a wasp takes the form of a stronger individual than it is in reality, should be extended to the entire population at a rate of fire. And yet, it does not.

To find out what makes wasps remain honest, Elizabeth Tibbetts of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues, using paint gave a weak wasps more menacing look. Colored wasps incited by an opponent with whom they had never met before.

First contestants submitted to the fraudsters, but then changed their behavior and become aggressive. As a result, they were having a painted wasps stronger thrashing than unmasked wasps, including more incidents of intense aggression, such as biting and Climbing on the opponent. Perhaps this was done in order to confirm the real possibilities of fraud.

In the other experiment, the team used hormones to artificially improve the combat abilities of weak wasps, making them stronger than one would infer from the coloring of their faces. These wasps also got to nuts. Despite the strengthening of capacities, their opponents refused to obey them.

From this it follows that any difference between the face painting and behavior - is punishable by wasps, Tibbetts explained. This explains why it is still not there are liars and cheaters in the OS environment, in order to climb higher on the ladder.

Original: Newscientist


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