82 whales stranded on the coast of New Zealand


06/02/2011

Ten pilot whales and pilot whales have died as a result of the fact that about 82 mammals washed ashore the top of the South Island of New Zealand on Friday. This was reported by officials, fearing that other animals can not be sent to sea immediately.

"Staying for a long time on the rocks - is an ordeal for them, and almost the same as that to remain a long time in the sun" - said the representative of the Department of Conservation, Trish Grant (Trish Grant). "Unfortunately some just die. But we are not losing hope that the remaining whales survive until tomorrow, when we can once again put them in swimming."

Massive release of mammals stranded occurred in Faruel Sleeps in Golden Bay, about 150 kilometers from the west (95 miles), close to the tourist city of Nelson (Nelson). Local residents initially reported that about 30 whales were thrown aground, but the number of animals has increased significantly in the afternoon.

About 100 personnel departments of conservation, according to Grant, have been involved in order to ensure the whales cool and wet conditions, protecting them from the sun in the afternoon.

The next highest point of the tide should be roughly around midnight, but it would be too dangerous for the rescue animals, so the staff had to wait until morning to attempt to use the release of whales.

Such a massive release of whales stranded far from rare in this area, according to Grant, and on this occasion there are different theories as to why the animals themselves nailed to the shore.

"This is something that happens quite often in Golden Bay with pilot whales. Maybe even the whole thing in the shape of the bay, which would be a simple navigational error of animals."

Whales pilots or pilot whales, which reach a length of six meters (20 feet) are the most common type of whales inhabiting the waters of New Zealand.

Last month, 24 whales died after aground near the Rhine Cap (Cape Reinga), in the far north of the country. In December 2009, more than 120 whales were found dead in two separate coasts in Farvel asleep and Colleville Bay on the North Island.

Original: Physorg Translation: M. Potter


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