Mutant two-headed snake surprises zoo visitors in Ukraine


16/07/2011

Snake with two heads, which are able to think and eat separately and even steal food, each other, has become the main object of curiosity to all visitors at the zoo in Ukraine. Small albino snake species California Kingsnake, now a tourist attraction in the Black Sea resort of Yalta zoo staff as reported news agency AFP.

Two heads snakes are completely independent of each other, do not always come to an agreement and even try to grab food with each other, as told to the owners of the private zoo, called "Fairy Tale".

"Sometimes one head intends to crawl in one direction, while the other tends to the other side" - said Oleg Zubkov agency AFP.

One of the zoo, as well as his landlord, Ruslan Yakovenko added that he always tries to feed the snake’s two heads, one separately as they sometimes fight each other for food. "If the snake is really hungry, head can steal each other’s food," - he said, adding that he also has to separate the head reptile barrier.

"The second head may be very angry, but both then feel a sense of satiety, as they are the owners of a stomach" - he told the news agency AFP.

The owner of the zoo also explained that the king snakes of this species on the slopes to hunt other reptiles, meaning one of the snake’s head could instinctively try to attack and eat the other.

Three year old reptile, whose length is 60 inches, is a loan from Germany. The number of visitors to the zoo almost doubled since the snake came from Germany in the beginning of July, as noted in his report the zoo keeper Ruslan Yakovenko.

"A lot of people come to the zoo feeling horrified and leave it feeling admiration." The snake, which is considered to be Europe’s only two-headed snake in the terrarium will be in Ukraine until September.

Original: Physorg Translation: M. Potter


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