Scientists have discovered the smallest furry insect


30/04/2013

Tinkerbella nana - a new kind of small flying fairy flies with thin fringe fringed wings, named after the fairy Tinker Bell from "Peter Pan," the scientists struck their microscopic size.

Flying fairies are a kind of parasitic wasps and tend to live in the eggs and larvae of other insects. This is a disgusting way of life, but it does flies useful for farmers who use them to monitor the activities of insect pests.

Most of the flies, including Kikiki huna, Hawaiian species have remarkably small dimensions. Thus, the length of the insect is 0.13 mm and the diameter of it - no more than pencil lead pencil. Because of that flies very difficult to find, but a group of researchers led by John Haber (John Huber) of the organization of Natural Resources Canada (Natural Resources Canada) persistently sought in the eggs of insects, insects, soil and on plants in the Alajuela province of Costa Rica.

There they found a few members of the species T. Nana, each of which reaches less than 250 micrometers in length. A micrometer is a thousandth of a millimeter.

Under a microscope, you can see the structure of small flies. Particularly interesting structure of their long wings with hairs forming a fringe around the edges. The form of the wings may help reduce insect resist wind and turbulence during the flight. This feature of the structure allows them to make up to 100 strokes per second.

Researchers do not yet know how little can be insects, since they are not yet known at what stage of development is located at the time of detection of flies, Haber said.

"If we have not found, it is already very close to the discovery of the smallest insects in the world," - said the researcher reported. Researchers published their data in the journal Journal of Hymenoptera Research.

Original: Livescience.com Translation: M. Potter


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